Mythical Blue Waffle – Busting the MYTH’S Behind Blue Waffles Disease

Blue Waffle Disease

Blue waffle disease, as you can probably guess straight off from the stupid name, is not a real thing.

If you've ever run into talk about it, then possibly you've heard people try to make it sound more credible by saying it in a hushed, dramatic voice, but rest assured: It's not real.

It is not a stupid casual term for a real medical phenomenon. There's no such thing as blue waffle disease.

​​"Blue waffle disease" is an unnecessarily graphic and unsavory hoax, passed around and offered fake credibility by the internet.

​The existence of the hoax dates back to at least 2010, showing up in the news a few times in 2013 when it trickled its way up from the dark dregs of the internet to public mention, carried by overly trusting people taken in by an April Fool's joke.

Busting the blue waffle MYTH

Okay, But What Is It?

"Waffle" is slang for vagina, and "blue waffle disease" is a fake STD, circulated as an urban myth.

As you can probably guess even if this is your first time hearing of it, it's supposed to turn vaginas blue.

Like some less fun and friendly urban myths, its purpose is to disgust people, and maybe make fun of them for being taken in by misinformation. Moth Man, this ain't.​

How can you that it is NOT REAL?​​

When we first found that the wrong information is being circulating around the internet about this condition, we reached out to plenty of Gynecologist, Dermatologist and Venereologist for their expert opinion.

You will find them below.​ At the end of all interviews, we concluded that Blue Waffle is not real disease.

​The panic meant to be incited by the fake epidemic this myth is based around is spread around and backed up by photomanips people circulate around. This is the information age, where anyone with a computer can get a good image editing program, but it's still not hard to be taken in by a shocking image and made to doubt your own assessment of whether or not it must be fake when surrounded by the voices of people who are acting like it's legitimate.

​The images prompted discussion, even if it was mostly highly skeptical, which cemented the hoax's status as a capital-T Thing. Even if it's easily disproven, in some ways it was already way too late when the idea entered common knowledge. For every twenty people who scoff, there's going to be someone vulnerable to misinformation, and someone else who is willing to take advantage of that.

​The Only Thing That's Really Unhealthy Here is Few People in Our Society

The myth of blue waffle disease has been summarily debunked by every reputable source to tackle it. Snopes declared it false, and threw in a free tip to readers not to Google the term, to save their own eyes.

The details of the hoax don't even make a passing attempt at hiding that they're openly misogynistic. The urban myth specifies that this fake STD is one that can only be passed from women to men, framing women as a threat. If women can't catch it, basic logic might ask where they got it in the first place.

The purpose of scary stories like this is to trick impressionable young women into fearing their own sexuality, casting sex as something unhealthy and dirty, but only when women are the ones having it, in a manner the most repressed Puritans probably would have been proud of.

We're not the first ones to take this stance - Elizabeth Boskey wrote a scathing editorial on just that subject, but we'll break down the basics of the problems for you here:

  • The most people who are convinced that blue waffle is a real thing are teenagers.
  • Most variations of the blue waffle myth are specific that it strikes women who have too much sex, leaving out their presumably mostly-male lovers entirely.
  • ​It's framed as a moral issue, not a health issue, like we're supposed to think it's a punishment delivered by karma for people's actions.
  • ​The stories often frame the women turning imaginary colors as threats, not victims. To...innocent victims who want to have sex, but are not those women, who do not notice when they have sex with someone whose vagina is blue? Look, no one said this myth made sense.
  • The urban legend hinges on intentionally repulsive and inflammatory language (waffle?)

Debunked By Experts

Dr. Amy Whitaker, of the Women's Health Foundation, tore apart the myth on the WHF blog right out of the gate in the early days of 2011. It was updated in 2016 because the post was so popular and the infamous blue waffle myth still hadn't been debunked and passed out of memory among the public - as evidenced by the existence of this article.

I personally never found patient of this disease neither able to find in medical books. Seems like it just an internet meme that being circulated as a deadliest STD disease. 

While writing this article I personally met many Gynecologist and Venerologist and found that all of them are agree with one thing "Blue waffle disease is not real and all the pictures that are floating around internet probably taken by women who used gentian violet for yeast infection".

Dr. Sachin 
Expert Author

A Spotter's Guide to Dumb Stuff People Will Try to Tell You

While we've got you here, here are some other things that having too much sex will not do and bits of "common knowledge" that ignorant people, especially misled teenagers, think is true about women's bodies:

  • No, having lots of orgasms will not stretch out or in any other way change the shape of a woman's vagina. It definitely won't only do this when a woman has sex with lots of different people, instead of, say, having sex with her husband every day. Come on, that doesn't even make sense.

Let's really run through the logic of the high school bus: If you poked yourself in the arm, as hard as you felt like without hurting yourself, for ten minutes every day, would there eventually be a gaping, finger-shaped impression in your arm? No? Didn't think so. You might bruise it, but that would mean you were doing it wrong. Which brings us to:

  • Sex shouldn't hurt. Ever. Unless you're into that, but that's a graduate-level technique. Either way, it's not the default. No, not even for women. No, not even when those women are virgins. A distressing number of teenagers and some adults think it's a fact that women should bleed the first time they have sex. This is not true.
  • Hymens aren't important. Cited often as reasoning for the above point, the hymen is a mucousal membrane and such an obscure part of the body you're extremely unlikely to ever actually run into it, not a biological tamper-proof seal or a flesh barrier keeping women from having good sex. An adult female who's never had sex or masturbated probably won't have one because basic activity and periods go through them like they're tissue paper. Yes, it's true, Queen Elizabeth I's doctors were full of it. We're as shocked as you are.

Sorry, it's all fake. There are no negative side effects to regularly having adequately protected sex. So where does the idea that women need to be more careful about sex than men come from, and how did it get so deeply entrenched? In all likelihood it's a combination of leftover safety measures from back when sex was much harder to practice cautiously - you know, before the invention of condoms and birth control - and an attempt to control people, women and men alike, by limiting their actions.

A Different Moral Problem

If common knowledge tells you not to do something, but fails to back up why with good reasons? Take it with a grain of salt. And if someone implies your actions should be guided a certain way or that you should judge other people because otherwise you or they will turn bright colors...? Take it with a whole salt mine.

Much like an infection thrives in the human body, the myth of the blue waffle disease is one that can only thrive in an environment suited for it. The fact is, we as a culture have accidentally created a hothouse perfect for growing our own misinformation about sex and spreading it like an epidemic.

By surrounding sex, an activity which, in practice, almost everyone will do, with stigma, it makes it hard to collect reliable information about that topic, confirm or deny dubious-sounding things you hear about it, and bust giant whoppers reliably when you encounter them.

An Incubating Chamber (For Lies)

An age barrier is set up in our society about talking about sex that only allows people to start talking and asking frankly about the subject without having to worry about causing trouble for themselves years after it's likely to start coming up. By the time young people reach this arbitrary acceptable age, they've already established a body of knowledge about the topic of sex through rumor and trial and error - and it's likely to be riddled with misinformation.

Even the most conscientious people can have trouble getting their facts straight, and that is the perfect environment for misinformation to be spread. Like the urban legend of the blue waffle disease. Though it started as a malicious prank, the people who spread information about the fake STI around are largely composed of people who aren't malicious, but, quite simply, wrong.

They think they're helping. They think they're being smart. And it's not their fault, because they live in a world that facilitates them being taken in by misinformation the way they have been. If you can't find anyone who will talk to you about a topic, how are you supposed to know when something sounds sketchy? Especially in a case like that of blue waffle when false claims are backed up with fabricated, but inflammatory, photo evidence.

HOW TO DEAL

Armed with the knowledge that blue waffle disease is fake, it's up to the discerning reader to do their best to spot the ugly mindsets behind it and myths like it and avoid perpetuating them.